In Your Head 12th October 2016

Switching on your eyesight

Rhian Lewis couldn’t believe it when doctors turned on her bionic eye for the first time. The 50-year-old from Wales has retinitis pigmentosa, a disease involving a faulty gene in which a person’s vision dims from the periphery ...

by Karen Finn

In Your Head 7th October 2016

Looking after your mental health

Wearing devices that monitor physical changes in our bodies has become the new norm. But what if this so-called ‘wearable technology’ could track our mental health, too? The idea isn’t as far-fetched as it may sound. Soon we’ll ...

by Karen Finn

In Your Head 13th September 2016

I’m a Warrior, Not a Victim

As a writer, I have my selection of favourite words in the English language. Words like orang-utan, spiralizer, and cocoon. However, to me, the best word in the English language is: warrior. While for some of you this word might ...

by Alice Barker

In Your Head 29th August 2016

Crossing mountains despite Parkinson’s

Tony Seidl was shocked when, at age 39, doctors diagnosed him with Parkinson’s disease. After all, isn’t it something people’s grandparents have? In fact, most of the one in 500 people who have Parkinson’s are over 50 but you ...

by Karen Finn

In Your Head 13th June 2016

Stopping seizures in their tracks

After enduring regular epileptic seizures and trying new treatments for nearly three decades, Hélène Gonnot was fed up. The epilepsy medication that she’d been taking since her teens wasn’t working and Hélène’s doctors ...

by Karen Finn

In Your Head 26th May 2016

This MS patient welcomes an uphill climb

Avid mountaineer Ginty Telfer-Wilkes refuses to let multiple sclerosis get in the way of her sky-high pursuits. Since being diagnosed with the neurological condition last year, Ginty has made it her personal mission to show the world that people with ...

by Karen Finn

In Your Head 12th January 2016

Ignorance is not always bliss

The stigma and misunderstanding that surround mental illness in developing countries leads to humiliation and hardship. Maurilia’s family had tied a rope around her neck to restrain her after a series of aggressive outbursts. Once a healthy and active ...

by Gary Finnegan